3. Men's role in the struggle for women’s equality?

Home Forums Dialogue Portal Dialogue Portal: Part 3 3. Men's role in the struggle for women’s equality?

This topic contains 55 replies, has 53 voices, and was last updated by  Kerry R 1 year ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 46 through 56 (of 56 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #4743

    Judy Chicago
    Participant

    P.S. As someone who has spent 5 decades working for change in and out of the art institutions, I am discouraged by the fact that we seem to be moving backwards, especially in studio art which has been deeply affected by the market-driven art world. As a result, students are being encouraged to substitute form for content, instant gratification for deep discovery and trivial ideas for lasting one. As a student of women’s history, I realize that change takes a long time and that periods of progress are followed by a push-back by the culture which is what we are presently in. How I long for the revolutionary fervor of the 1970s. Judy Chicago

    #4920

    afinamore
    Participant

    I agree with the fact that “feminism is for everybody” (hooks, 2000) because it should not be a competition, it should not isolate just the oppression of women. It should speak to everyone that feels segregation is a part of their life or affects them everyday and inspire them to do something about it.

    #4955

    smiville
    Participant

    . I do think that men have a role to play in women’s efforts to obtain equality of opportunity and of being valued in equal proportion to men. Men and women are both human beings and exist in relation to one another in a fundamental way. For women to find real equality men must move from their position of dominance and privilege to a state of awareness of and empathy for women. According to Michael Kimmel, one of the characteristics of privilege, of being in the power center, is lack of awareness of one’s state of privilege, i.e., as he also states, privilege is invisible. Those that wear it do so without having to think about it. In order for women to be equal, men must be willing to shed the cloak of privilege that shields them and protects their status, only then can a deep and constructive responsive dynamic exist between men and women. If men alter their masculine posture, it will help women to be powerful, assertive and ambitious as well as possessing qualities considered feminine. Becoming aware and breaking down the codes of what it means to be manly, would go a long way to helping women gain equality.

    #4964

    NicoleP
    Participant

    I think everyone should have a role in the struggle for women’s equality. If men don’t have a role than how can we expect to see any change in how women are treated and viewed? Woman cannot gain the rights they deserve if this is a us vs them fight. We as a united society must recognize that women are not yet treated equally to men and that they should be. This simple recognition will help move us forward in the process of unifying men and women in a way that modernizes women’s rights.

    #5037

    Anonymous

    Luckily, Chicago kept slides, photos, and video of the understudy work that originated from her showing ventures, and her arranging materials and showing reflections, which are incorporated into the Penn State documents. This presentation looks to conceivable outcomes for research and educating with the gathering.

    Marilyn Stewart The Dinner Party Curriculum Project, now in its eighth year, started when, at the demand of Judy Chicago, a gathering of workforce at Kutztown University met to consolidation substantive thoughts regarding educational programs with the implications implanted in and recommended by The Dinner Party.

    This presentation highlights the different pathways took after since that time, breathing life into this notorious fine art for K-12 instructors and their understudies. Daunted with the patriarchal hd car images arrangement of teaching craftsmen, Judy Chicago built up a women’s activist craftsmanship instructional method that enabled ladies to perceive that their encounters could be an impetus for workmanship.

    #5106

    paulwalker
    Participant

    It’s not a competition but yes of course, IT IS. I always take dissertation service as a compeition because it requires research, knowledge and techniques.

    #7129

    Sophia Uricoli
    Participant

    What About Men alluded to the the importance of men being supportive of equality because women’s movements are seemingly not successful without the involvement of men. Men are so superior to women in society which is proved through their status in the workplace, in the government, their payment in jobs and their overall opportunity, therefore it is important that they use that power for good. This really put the question of “who would be willing to give up that privilege to do what it is right?” in place for me. With that being said, men I believe that all men have a duty and role in the fight for women’s equality because they have this outward privilege that women do not have. Men, unfortunately, have a larger voice in the majority (if not, all) platforms such as art, media, and corporate life, therefore their role would be supporting and encouraging others to educate and support women in the movement as well. Another role of men would be to educate themselves on the importance and the existence of their own privilege as well along with understanding and acknowledging women’s struggle. With doing so, the support and growth of movements like the feminist movement would allow for expansion and more support because it would be normalized amongst the “dominant” gender.

    #7133

    Submitted by Armelys on Jan. 24, 2019: My attention was caught when Donald Woodman said his wife is very active in these feminist movements and that he is honored to be accepted to speak at these events. He also stresses the importance of bringing men to events to broaden their horizons. So when asked “Why do we have to use the word feminist? Why not humanist? Or ‘Femanist?’” I immediately started asking these questions myself. The word feminism can be used to fuel a divide between man and woman and even discourage men from supporting women in these movements.

    So, why is complicated? A very important point that Woodland discusses in his speech is learning the history. If we do not learn our history, problems will continue to manifest in other forms. So, he says Christian ideals include women being subservient and these ideals have been institutionalized in the United States. These ideals are systematically lodged in our workplace, cultures and any other aspects of our life.
    At the same time, there may be a simple solution. Why don’t men just support women? Women have supported men before in anti-war movements, civil rights movement and the list goes on. So why can this energy be reciprocated? A realization that was made by Donald Woodman and soon by me is that it is difficult to be a man and speak out against the dominant culture. To speak against the dominant fuels the divide between us vs them.Viewing it from a naturalistic perspective, if men defend the other side, they are at risk of opting out on rewards a dominant white man would receive. It is important to realize as well that the only people who are going to defend and protect your beliefs is yourself and other people who are directly affected by it. It brought an interesting perspective that the reason they don’t support women as much as feminist would look is because they are at risk of opting on benefits because of beliefs don’t necessarily resonate with them.

    #7144

    Shelby
    Participant

    I think there is a positive and negative role that men play in the struggle for women’s equality. There are men out there doing their part and helping the fight for women’s equality however, there are also many men who are not.
    I think about the ideas of being a single woman today; its hard ad we can barley afford to survive even with a decent job. Because of course women get paid less than men therefore trying to survive on our good job still isn’t good enough. Yet, a single man can find it relatively easy to survive with their income higher than that of a woman. Yes, this is a patriarchal concept that has been passed down from generation to generation however do we see men willing to stand up and take a pay cut? It brings us back to the idea that a women is “lost” without a man, but society makes it difficult to even survive without a second person in the household.
    Men have the larger voice, the bigger platform and more influence women need their support to create an equal space; financially, competitively and socially. The most difficult part of this process is the concept of having men accept ad understand the privilege they have as a dominant gender. Then they have to be willing to accept the fact that they should work to even the playing field rather than trying to keep the privilege to themselves.

    #7145

    evoyvodich
    Participant

    The main point I took from Donald Woodman’s presentation “What about Men?” is this: it’s not called humanism for a reason. “All Lives Matter” is not a coverall for the Black Lives matter movement. So Feminism it is! As men are the privileged sex in the work of gaining equal rights for women, they play a crucial role in changing all of the small perceptions and gender understandings we continually push both subconsciously and consciously in the 21st century, even though we often acknowledge their sexist connotations in our minds. I think feminist men have a job to be the ones in everyday conversations or discussions to question the way we deem things according to gender in archaic ways such as behavior and consequences. A question is where it starts, because people do need to stop and think about the assumptions and prejudices we all make. Change starts with small actions like these that are woven into our culture at our local schools, governments, and our places of work.

    #7159

    Kerry R
    Participant

    Donald Woodman pointed out that President Obama’s response to the hypothetical question of asking if he would allow his son to play professional football should have been the realist remark that he “has two daughters that are not allowed to play football” was compelling. It is too easy to respond in generalizations when the real issue is concrete and undeniable. There is not a professional football league for women and that is more of an issue at hand than the question of safety in the sport. I enjoyed how Woodman changed the conversation. I will say I was amused about his impression of Penn State when he entered the University through Park Drive and first saw Beaver Stadium. I’m sure it cast long shadows over the cow pastures that you actually see first, but I would have to disagree on this point. I have found intriguing cultural awareness at Penn State and it is a short drive to see the paws in front of Palmer that is in the heart of campus.

Viewing 11 posts - 46 through 56 (of 56 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.